Apr 22, 2021  
2013-2014 Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    PHT 2224 - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures II


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 1103, PHT 1310
    Corequisite(s): PHT 1211, PHT 2224L, PHT 1801L
    Course introduces concepts of therapeutic exercise with regards to its principles and objectives. The theory of and application of specific exercise regimes are presented. Principles of ROM and stretching techniques are presented. A basic introduction to goniometry and manual muscle testing procedures is presented as it pertains to the development of therapeutic exercise interventions. Professional behaviors, at the intermediate level, are assessed.
  
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    PHT 2224L - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures II Lab


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 1103L, PHT 1200L
    Pre or Corequisite(s): PHT 1211L, PHT 2224, PHT 1020
    Laboratory sessions for Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures II (PHT 2224) are designed to provide the student with observation and actual application of therapeutic exercise in the laboratory setting. Case studies of various medical conditions with emphasis on therapeutic interventions are completed. ROM, strengthening and stretching techniques are practiced. Goniometry and manual muscle testing procedures are practiced as they relate to the provision of therapeutic exercise. Data collection relative to the course content as well as patient and caregiver education are emphasized. Students are expected to demonstrate competency in developing and carrying out an appropriate therapeutic program including effective documentation. Practical examinations are completed.
  
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    PHT 2704 - Rehabilitation Procedures


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 2162, PHT 1350
    Corequisite(s): PHT 2704L, PHT 2931
    Advanced course designed to develop skill in and understanding of the underlying principles of advanced physical therapy plans of care including motor learning principles. Techniques presented include advanced therapeutic exercise programs (stroke, spinal cord injured, etc.) proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF), Bobath and Brunnstrom. Amputations and principles of prosthetics are detailed with training, fitting, and check-out procedures reviewed.
  
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    PHT 2704L - Rehabilitative Procedures Lab


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 2162,PHT 2120L
    Corequisite(s): PHT 2704, PHT 2931
    Laboratory sessions for Rehabilitative Procedures (PHT 2704) are designed for the students to practice the utilization of developmental postures in patient interventions as well as PNF, facilitation/inhibition techniques and others forms of advanced therapeutic exercise approaches. Residual limb wrapping and therapeutic management for patients with amputations are practiced. Case studies of various medical conditions with emphasis on advanced therapeutic exercise approaches as well as application of prosthetic principles are completed. Data collection relative to the course content as well as patient and caregiver education are emphasized. Students are expected to demonstrate competency in developing and carrying out appropriate interventions for a patient with neurological deficits. Practical examinations are completed.
  
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    PHT 2810L - Clinical Practice II


    5 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 1810L, PHT 1020, PHT 2224L
    Corequisite(s): PHT 2162, PHT 2120
    This course is a second in a series of three clinical practicums. Students are expected to perform at an intermediate level. Course involves student assignment to local clinical facility. Includes scheduled class meetings to review clinical performance objectives, the self-appraisal process, and overall requirements for this intermediate level practicum. Class discussions are held to share and discuss experiences, patient care problems, learning styles, cooperative group participation, acceptance and implementation of constructive criticism, etc. A clinical journal and an in-service are required. Weekly online discussion forums facilitate critical thinking, peer review, and managing clinical situations at the intermediate level. Students attend a personal conference with the academic coordinator of clinical education to discuss progress and to identify areas of strength/weakness with appropriate target dates and methods of amelioration, if needed. Students receive a satisfactory/fail grade based upon clinical performance as well as other grading criteria detailed in the course syllabus.
  
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    PHT 2820L - Clinical Practice III


    5 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 2120, PHT 2810L
    Corequisite(s): PHT 2704
    This course is the last in a series of three clinical practicums. Students are expected to perform at an entry level. Course involves full time student assignment to a local clinical facility. A clinical journal, a case study report, and a research project are required. Weekly online discussion forums facilitate critical thinking, peer review, and managing clinical situations at the entry level. Students may attend a personal conference with the academic coordinator of clinical education to discuss progress and to identify areas of strength/weakness with appropriate target dates and methods of amelioration where necessary. Students receive a satisfactory/fail grade based upon clinical performance as well as other grading criteria detailed in the course syllabus.
  
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    PHT 2931 - Transition Seminar


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 2120, PHT 2810L
    Pre or Corequisite: PHT 2704
    A project-based seminar course that utilizes discussion and presentations to address content such as legal and ethical issues, interpersonal skill refinement, employment techniques, quality assurance, and career development. Discharge planning concepts are reviewed. Empathy for patients and enhanced understanding the PT assistant's responsibility to the community are explored through a community advocacy project. A capstone project is completed to assess entry-level preparation. The course also provides a comprehensive curriculum review and presents details on applying for licensure as students prepare for the transition to the work place. Professional behaviors, at the entry-level, are assessed.
  
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    PHY 1007 - Physics for the Health Sciences - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 1033 or higher with a minimum grade of “C” and successful completion of Developmental courses in reading and writing
    This is a one-semester course for students in the health sciences who need a background in physics which is broad in scope and stresses applications in the health field. This course cannot be used to meet the AA science requirement since it has no accompanying laboratory.
  
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    PHY 1007L - Physics for the Health Sciences Laboratory


    Prerequisite(s): MAT 1033, or any higher level math course, with a grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): PHY 1007
    This laboratory course accompanies PHY 1007 and is a one-semester course for students in the health sciences who need a background in physics which is broad in scope and stresses applications in the health field. The course is designed to enhance the learning of physical concepts through a hands-on approach, emphasizing inquiry and problem solving in laboratory investigations.
  
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    PHY 2048 - General Physics I


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): MAC 2311 with a minimum grade of "C" and successful completion of Developmental courses in reading and writing
    Corequisite(s): PHY 2048L
    This calculus-based physics course is the first part of a sequence of two courses.  The sequence covers the underlying principles and laws of classical mechanics, oscillations, waves, fluids, sound, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, elements of optics, and modern physics.
  
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    PHY 2048L - General Physics I Laboratory


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): MAC 2311 with a minimum grade of "C" and successful completion of Developmental courses in reading and writing.
    Corequisite(s): PHY 2048
    This laboratory course accompanies PHY 2048 and is the first part of a sequence of two courses. The sequence includes investigations that illustrate and explore concepts and principles related to force and motion, work and energy, rotation, gravity, properties of matter, electric charges and currents, resistance and capacitance, magnetism and electromagnetic induction, optics, and nuclear radiation. The course is designed to encourage the concept of "learning by doing" and enhance student learning of physical concepts.  It introduces students to experimental procedures, techniques and equipment; it involves setting up the laboratory equipment, collection of data, interpretation of experimental data and preparation of a lab report.
  
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    PHY 2049 - General Physics II


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2048 and PHY 2048L with a minimum grade of "C" in each course
    Corequisite(s): PHY 2049L
    This calculus-based physics course is the second part of a sequence of two courses.  The sequence covers the underlying principles and laws of classical mechanics, oscillations, waves, fluids, sound, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, elements of optics, and modern physics.
  
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    PHY 2049L - General Physics II Laboratory


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2048 and PHY 2048L with a minimum grade of "C" in each course
    Corequisite(s): PHY 2049
    This laboratory course accompanies PHY 2049 and is the second part of a sequence of two courses. The sequence includes investigations that illustrate and explore concepts and principles related to force and motion, work and energy, rotation, gravity, properties of matter, electric charges and currents, resistance and capacitance, magnetism and electromagnetic induction, optics, and nuclear radiation. The course is designed to encourage the concept of "learning by doing" and enhance student learning of physical concepts.  It introduces students to experimental procedures, techniques and equipment; it involves setting up the laboratory equipment, collection of data, interpretation of experimental data and preparation of a lab report.
  
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    PHY 2053 - College Physics I


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): {A grade of "C" or better in (MAC 1140 and MAC 1114) or MAC 1147} and successful completion of Developmental courses in reading and writing
    Corequisite(s): PHY 2053L
    This physics course, based on algebra and trigonometry, is the first part of a sequence of two courses.  The sequence covers the underlying principles and laws of classical mechanics, oscillations, waves, fluids, sound, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, elements of optics and modern physics.
  
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    PHY 2053L - College Physics I Laboratory


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): {A grade of "C" or better in (MAC 1140 and MAC 1114) or MAC 1147} and successful completion of Developmental courses in reading and writing
    Corequisite(s): PHY 2053
    This laboratory course accompanies PHY 2053 and is the first part of a sequence of two courses. The sequence includes investigations that illustrate and explore concepts and principles related to force and motion, work and energy, rotation, gravity, properties of matter, electric charges and currents, resistance and capacitance, magnetism and electromagnetic induction, optics, and nuclear radiation.  The course is designed to encourage the concept of "learning by doing" and enhance student learning of physical concepts.  It introduces students to experimental procedures, techniques and equipment; it involves setting up the laboratory equipment, collection of data, interpretation of experimental data, and preparation of a lab report.
  
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    PHY 2054 - College Physics II


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2053 and PHY 2053L with a minimum grade of "C" in each course
    Corequisite(s): PHY 2054L
    This physics course, based on algebra and trigonometry, is the second part of a sequence of two courses.  The sequence covers the underlying principles and laws of classical mechanics, oscillations, waves, fluids, sound, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, elements of optics, and modern physics.
  
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    PHY 2054L - College Physics II Laboratory


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2053 and PHY 2053L with a minimum grade of "C" in each course
    Corequisite(s): PHY 2054
    This laboratory course accompanies PHY 2054 and is the second part of a sequence of two courses. The sequence includes investigations that illustrate and explore concepts and principles related to force and motion, work and energy, rotation, gravity, properties of matter, electric charges and currents, resistance and capacitance, magnetism and electromagnetic induction, optics, and nuclear radiation.  The course is designed to encourage the concept of "learning by doing" and enhance the student learning of physical concepts.  It introduces students to experimental procedures, techniques and equipment; it involves setting up the laboratory equipment, collection of data, interpretation of experimental data, and preparation of a lab report.
  
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    PLA 1003 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of the training and purpose of paralegals. It examines the role of the lawyer and the paralegal in modern society, the ethical and professional practice standards applicable to both lawyer and paralegal, and surveys the various fields of law to be covered in the Paralegal Studies program.
  
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    PLA 1103 - Legal Research and Writing I


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or higher, or equivalent
    This course presents an introduction to legal research including citation form, case law, reading and finding statutes, legislative history, constitutional law, administrative law, court rules, local rules, loose-leaf services, secondary references, computer research, and ethical considerations.
  
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    PLA 2114 - Legal Research and Writing II


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PLA 1103 with a grade of "C" or higher
    This course provides research and writing skills that the paralegal needs, with emphasis on legal writing and computer-assisted legal research. The course is intended to familiarize students with problems, procedures, and ethics in legal research and writing. Computerized legal research techniques using LEXIS are examined in depth to complement the techniques learned in PLA 1103. Ethical issues in legal research and writing are explored in depth, in particular issues relating to computer-assisted legal research and internet resources.
  
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    PLA 2200 - Litigation


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or higher, or equivalent
    This course is designed to familiarize the student with the structure of the federal and state judicial systems and their jurisdictions. It introduces the student to the basic litigation process and its procedural aspects by focusing on the federal and state rules of civil procedure and evidence. It includes comparisons of state and federal court rules, the drafting of pleadings, and ethical considerations relating to litigation.
  
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    PLA 2202 - Torts


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or higher, or equivalent
    This course covers principles of tort litigation, lawyer and client relationships, causes of action, remedies and defenses, jurisdiction, commencement of lawsuits, rules of procedure, pleadings, gathering evidence, and ethical considerations.
  
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    PLA 2600 - Wills, Trusts, and Probate Administration


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or higher, or equivalent
    This course provides instruction in estate planning, wills, probate practice and procedures, jurisdiction, functions of lawyers and personal representatives, initial steps in probate, inventory and appraisal, creditors' claims, distribution and discharge, ancillary administration, and ethical considerations.
  
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    PLA 2610 - Real Estate Law and Property


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or equivalent
    This course provides a study of ownership, title issues, legal descriptions, real estate contracts, real estate transfers and transactions, real estate closings, and ethical considerations.
  
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    PLA 2763 - Law Office Management


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or higher, or equivalent
    This course covers principles of organization and management, management styles, communications process, utilizing paralegals, management of office employees, office environment, office systems, office functions, financial management, and ethical considerations in law office management.
  
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    PLA 2800 - Family Law


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or equivalent
    This course presents a study of various aspects of family law, including marriage, premarital and other agreements, annulment, dissolution of marriage, separation agreements, child custody, child support, alimony, judicial separation, adoptions, and ethical considerations relating to the field of family law.
  
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    PLA 2880 - Constitutional Law


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or higher, or equivalent
    This course examines the organization of the U.S. government, the relationship between the U.S. government and its citizens, and the rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizens as outlined in the U.S. Constitution. Special focus is on the first Ten Amendments of the U.S. Constitution, and the U.S. Constitution is presented from a legal perspective.
  
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    PLA 2930 - Capstone--Portfolio


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 18 credit hours of PLA coursework, to include either CJL 2100 and/or BUL 2241--all with a grade of "C" or better.
    Corequisite(s): PLA 2942
    THIS COURSE IS REQUIRED AND IS DESIGNED FOR STUDENTS PREPARING TO GRADUATE AND TRANSITION TO EMPLOYMENT AND/OR CONTINUING EDUCATION. This capstone course will provide the opportunity for students to demonstrate what they have learned in the A.S. Paralegal program and gauge their ability to apply it. Students will engage in active discussions on law related topics and issues, particularly those that relate to current events. This course also requires the student to write a short paper on a contemporary legal topic or issue. Additionally, the student will prepare a cover letter and resume specifically for a paralegal or other law related position that he or she finds posted locally, nationally, or internationally. Students not working in a related field or who desire to improve their current positions will be encouraged to apply for the positions they find. Successful completion of the course requires demonstrating learning outcomes from core courses by passing the comprehensive examination at the end of the course. STUDENTS MUST PASS THIS CLASS IN ORDER TO EARN THE PARALEGAL STUDIES, A.S. DEGREE.

     

  
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    PLA 2931 - Specialized Topics in Paralegal Studies


    1-3 credit(s)
    This course is intended to explore a wide range of varying topics in law and to provide students with an increased understanding of the legal and ethical implications of the subject at hand. Topics to be offered will provide a broad range of specialized subject matter and will be selected in areas of current interest or in highly focused areas within the law. Topics may vary from one semester to another. Topics will be offered as one, two, or three credits and can be combined with other topics for up to three hours of elective credit.
  
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    PLA 2942 - Paralegal Internship


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 18 credit hours of AS Paralegal degree core coursework, not including CGS 1100
    Corequisite(s): PLA 2930
    This course is designed to provide students with direct work experience in a legal setting such as a law firm, government agency, court, corporate legal department, or title company. Students will complete 135 hours of supervised paralegal work in a legal setting during their internship. Student experiences will be documented and evaluated by the supervising paralegal, lawyer, judge, judicial assistant, or title company supervisor. Students will submit a portfolio of legal writing samples and a report analyzing their work experiences at the end of the internship. Students are responsible for locating a suitable firm or organization in which to obtain this experience. The course is the capstone for the Edison State College AS degree in Paralegal Studies. Successful completion of this course demonstrates that students have effectively met the objectives and outcomes of the AS in Paralegal Studies Program.
  
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    POS 1949 - Practicum in Political Science


    3 credit(s)
    Directed work experience under cooperative training agreements with government in specialized areas. Includes an average of 45 hours of supervised work experience with a scheduled bi-weekly seminar.
  
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    POS 2041 - American National Government


    3 credit(s)
    This course is a study of the national government within the American federal system: its functions, processes, and contemporary problems of American political systems. Political parties, pressure groups, elections, Congress, the Presidency, and the Supreme Court are also discussed.
  
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    POS 2112 - American State and Local Politics


    3 credit(s)
    This course emphasizes practical politics and functional government. It is a critical analysis of state and community political systems and processes and uses the community as laboratory. Contacts with state/local officials are also included. Internships are encouraged and credit for practical experience is allowed when approved by instructor.
  
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    POS 2141 - Urban Government and Politics


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): POS 2112 with a grade of "C" or higher, or instructor approval
    This course is an introduction to the politics and functions of urban government using the local government as the laboratory for investigation. Students will interact with local government officials as they learn how government identifies community problems, allocates resources, prioritizes needs, addresses sustainability, and manages crises. Economic conditions, ethnicity, education, health care, affordable housing, environmental impact, and other issues will be featured.
  
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    POS 2949 - Practicum in Political Science II


    3 credit(s)
    Honors Practicum in American Government. This will be a comprehensive study of the many layers of government that we work with daily. We will observe political parties, pressure groups, elections, Congress, and the school systems. Daily news-breaking concerns will come under scrutiny to evaluate their short-term and long-term effects on our lives.
  
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    PSY 2012 - General Psychology I


    3 credit(s)
    This course is designed to give all students an introduction to psychology as a science and an understanding of psychology’s applications to everyday life. The general models and methods psychology uses are explored as well as the factors that influence human behavior, including physiology, genetics, sensation, perception, learning, memory cognition, emotions, motives, personality, abnormal behavior, and social interaction.
  
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    PSY 2014 - General Psychology II


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2012 with a grade of "D" or higher
    This is the second course in introductory psychology designed primarily for psychology majors. Emphasis is placed on the basic principles and concepts of experimental psychology, including scientific methodology and experimental investigation, conditioning and learning, perception, cognition, memory, motivation, and neuropsychology.
  
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    REA 0007 - Developmental Reading I (*)


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Testing or permission of the Dean, College and Career Readiness
    This is a required classroom/laboratory course for students whose reading test scores indicate a need for the development of reading skills. Emphasis is placed on improving literal and inferential comprehension, vocabulary, rate, listening, writing, and study skills. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of “C” or better.

    (*) Developmental credit only--does not count toward a degree or certificate.

  
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    REA 0017 - Developmental Reading II (*)


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): REA 0007, testing or permission of the Dean, College and Career Readiness.
    Required: an exit test must be passed to exit this course
    This is a classroom/laboratory course which is required for students whose reading test scores indicate a need for the development of reading skills. This is an integrated course of literal and inferential comprehension, vocabulary, rate and flexibility, listening, writing, and study skills. An exit test must be passed to exit this course. Successful completion of this course with a grade of “C” or better is part of a prerequisite for ENC 1101.

    (*) Developmental credit only--does not count toward a degree or certificate.

  
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    REA 1605 - Study Skills for College Students


    1 credit(s)
    Recommended for students needing to improve their reading speed, comprehension and vocabulary
    This course is designed to introduce specific study strategies and to encourage self-determination and student motivation. Emphasis is placed on the individual application of different learning techniques for all college students.
  
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    REA 2208 - Critical Reading


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): REA 0017 or Testing
    This course is designed for students with college-level reading skills who want to increase critical reading and thinking skills.
  
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    REA 2405 - Rate and Flexibility


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): REA 0017 or Testing
    This course is designed for students with good reading skills who want to increase reading speed and flexibility while maintaining or increasing their level of comprehension.
  
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    REA 2505 - Vocabulary Development


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): REA 0017 or Testing
    This course is designed for students with college level reading skills who want to increase their vocabulary by using word analysis skills, context clues, and figurative language techniques.
  
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    RED 3324 - Teaching Reading in the Middle School Curriculum


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Bachelor of Science in Education program or special permission from the Dean of the School of Education.
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates with theory and methodology for teaching reading at the middle school level. The course will emphasize Scientifically-Based Reading Research (SBRR) and strategies for developing vocabulary and comprehension. In this course, teacher candidates will also examine research and practice regarding teaching of specialized reading strategies for the various disciplines. Teacher candidates will also evaluate student progress in reading and integrate reading and study skills into content area instruction. This course requires 15 hours of field experience in a middle grades (5-9) reading classroom.

     

  
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    RED 4012 - Foundations of Literacy


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in program in Education or special permission from the Dean of School of Education.
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    Required: 15 hours of field experience in a K-5 classroom setting
    This course will prepare teacher candidates to be effective elementary reading teachers for a diverse population of students. Teacher candidates will develop a substantive knowledge of the structure and function of language for each of the five major components of the reading process: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Teacher candidates will evaluate the major reading philosophies and research-based strategies for teaching reading. Teacher candidates will also apply the research-based reading strategies to create literacy experiences for elementary students that engage them in critical thinking and constructivist principles. The teacher candidates will also learn how to differentiate reading instruction for English Language Learners (ELLs) and students with exceptionalities. This course requires fifteen hours of field experience in a K-5 classroom setting.
  
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    RED 4335 - Teaching Reading in the Content Areas


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in program in Education or special permission from the Dean of the School of Education.
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    This course is designed to promote effective teaching of literacy skills across the curriculum. The major emphasis of this course is placed on current theories, methods, and materials used in content area literacy instruction. Lecture, discussion, simulated teaching, and field work constitute different course activities. Also, this course emphasizes that reading is a process of student engagements in both fluent decoding of words and construction of meaning. This course covers knowledge of language structure and function and cognition for each of the five major components of the reading process.

     

  
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    RED 4519 - Diagnosis and Intervention in Reading


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RED 4012 and admission into the Bachelor of Science in Education program or special permission from the Dean of the School of Education.
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    Required: This course requires fifteen (15) hours of field experience in K-6 for ELED majors and fifteen (15) hours of field experience in 5-9 for LAED students.
    This course is designed to introduce teacher candidates to a wide range of reading assessment instruments and scientifically-based strategies used for understanding the individual and diverse needs of children. Candidates in this course will focus on effective use of assessment data to identify areas of concern and to plan, evaluate, and revise effective reading instruction to prevent difficulties and promote development. This class will explore materials and methods for a student-centered approach which builds on the students' strengths and will focus on developing intervention plans for struggling readers. After taking this course, teacher candidates will have a stronger understanding of the reading process including the five dimensions of reading (e.g. phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension) and factors that promote effective teaching of literacy skills. This course requires fifteen (15) hours of field experience in K-6 for ELED majors and fifteen (15) hours of field experience in 5-9 for LAED students.
  
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    REE 1040 - Real Estate Principles and Law


    5 credit(s)
    This course provides students with the fundamentals of real estate and license laws under Florida Statutes. It includes a study of the business and legal aspects of real estate ownership, contracts, deeds, titles, mortgage instruments, property law, and Florida Real Estate Commission governing policies and regulations relative to salespersons. Successful completion of this course will give the student the knowledge to own and invest in real estate either for commercial or personal implementation. Successful completion of this course is one of the prerequisites to taking the Florida licensing examination.
  
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    REE 2041 - Real Estate Brokerage Principles and Practices


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): REE 1040, or permission of instructor
    This course is a prerequisite to licensing as a real estate broker in Florida and deals with real estate appraisal, financing, investment, and office management. Students are expected to have mastered the mechanics of filling out closing statements prior to registration as a broker. Florida Real Estate Commission (FREC) rules apply.
  
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    REL 1921 - New Religious Movements in America


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): None-- however, REL 2300 is strongly suggested
    An exploration of America’s new religious movements from an interdisciplinary perspective that includes themes such as “cults” and the anti-cult movement, charismatic leadership, conversion methods, millennialism, modernization, and globalization. Groups include but are not limited to those deriving from 19th century influences and the Biblical tradition, New Age and Neo-Pagan, Eastern arrivals, African origins, Native American, and the science-related groups such as Scientology.
  
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    REL 2300 - World Religions- (I)


    3 credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to the world's religions with emphasis on oral and written traditions, historical development, beliefs, rituals, ethics, and function in society. Religions include but are not limited to Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

    (I) International or Diversity focus

  
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    RET 1007 - Respiratory Care Pharmacology - AS


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 1024 with a grade of "C" or higher
    The knowledge and skills required for safe, effective administration of therapeutic drugs and indications and contraindications associated with drug therapy are an integral part of this course. This course introduces essential and advanced concepts of pharmacology as related to Respiratory Care. Anatomy and physiology of body systems as related to drug therapy, as well as drugs related to both maintenance and emergency care, will be emphasized.
  
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    RET 1024 - Introduction to Cardiopulmonary Technology - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Permission to enter into the Respiratory Care or Cardiovascular Programs
    This course begins with an orientation to the Respiratory Care and Cardiovascular Technology Professions. The historical development of and current trends in cardiopulmonary technology are discussed. The basics of applied cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology as related to cardiopulmonary structure and function are introduced. There are weekly assignments for selected Medical Terminology and basic medical practice, related to asepsis. 
  
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    RET 1275C - Clinical Care Techniques - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 1024 with a grade of "C" or higher
    This combined lecture-laboratory course provides the foundation for both clinical skills and basic patient assessment skills necessary to basic Respiratory Care practice in a patient care setting. The course introduces the professional standards for medical asepsis, aerosol and oxygen therapy, patient positioning, basic cardiopulmonary assessment, medical ethics, and behavioral problems unique to patients with respiratory illnesses.
  
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    RET 1613C - Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 1024 with a grade of "C" or better
    This course covers: cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology in detail, diffusion and transport of cardio-respiratory gases, blood gas, renal and acid base physiology, ECG and basic hemodynamic analysis, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and human gestational development of the cardiopulmonary systems.  The physiologic calculations related to quantification of cardiopulmonary performance are also emphasized.
  
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    RET 1832L - Clinical Practicum I - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 1613C, RET 1007, and RET 1275C--all with a grade of "C" or higher
    This first clinical course consists of supervised clinical practice in both the on-campus cardiopulmonary laboratory and hospital clinical sites. Areas of concentration in this course are the development of bedside respiratory care, clinical skills, and observational opportunities for Respiratory Care diagnostic and interventional procedures. Students will be able to practice in realistic clinical environments in at least 2 local hospitals during this 6 week rotation.
  
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    RET 2234C - Respiratory Therapeutics - AS


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 1613C with a grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): RET 2874L, RET 2254C
    Bronchial hygiene, lung expansion therapy as well as medical gas, humidity and aerosolization concepts are presented, in concert with advanced respiratory pharmacology. Clinical and laboratory experience affords the student the opportunity to observe and practice basic respiratory procedures and equipment and clinical critical thinking . The concepts fundamental to Mechanical Ventilation are introduced.
  
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    RET 2244 - Critical Care Applications - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): For cardiovascular students: CVT 2420C, CVT 2620C, CVT 2840L--all with a grade of "C" or better
    For respiratory care students: RET 2234C, RET 2254C, RET 2714, and RET 2874L--all with a grade of "C" or better

    This course presents an in-depth study of critical care hemodynamic measurements for medical, surgical, and emergency patients. Intra-Aortic balloon pumping, Swan-Ganz monitoring, artificial airways, oxygen delivery devices, cardiovascular pharmacology, and basic ACLS algorithms are also presented.
  
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    RET 2254C - Respiratory Care Assessment - AS


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 1613C with a grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): RET 2234C
    In this course the student will learn the assessment of patients for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.  The focus of this course is the differential diagnosis procedures for cardiopulmonary patients. The development of appropriate communication skills with physicians, patients, and other health care providers is emphasized through the preparation and delivery of a complete patient case study.
  
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    RET 2264C - Advanced Mechanical Ventilation - AS


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 2234C with a grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): RET 2875L, RET 2295
    In this course, the student will learn the advanced theory and application of techniques for artificial mechanical ventilation, as well as ancillary forms of patient monitoring. The continued development of the application of the various modes of mechanical ventilation and their graphical analysis and ventilator synchrony are key concepts for the learner.  The laboratory will demonstrate the clinical concepts and applications to specific ventilator modes as well as ventilator types, used in the Southwest Florida clinical affiliates. The physiological and realistic formats for mechanical ventilation will be consistently contrasted throughout the course. This content, for this course, comprises the single greatest emphasis on the National Board Exams.
  
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    RET 2295 - Pulmonary Studies - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 2234C and RET 2254C, both with a grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): RET 2264C, RET 2875L
    Respiratory Care students investigate the causes of pulmonary diseases and injuries that impact on the pulmonary system structure and function. This course concentrates upon diagnostic techniques that lead to a better understanding of etiology and pathogenesis of pulmonary disease and response to injury. Critical thinking in response to the diagnostic process and treatment choice is emphasized. Clinical Simulation Exams are offered each week to reinforce the application of lecture material and prepare the student for NBRC Registry exams.
  
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    RET 2714 - Neonatal-Pediatric Respiratory Care - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 1613C with a grade of "C" or higher
    This course covers the development and physiology of the fetal and neonatal lung including perinatal circulation, pulmonary function in infants, and developmental physiology of the lung. Neonatal and pediatric pulmonary disorders and their corresponding respiratory care are emphasized.  An introduction to Neonatal and Pediatric therapeutic interventions including Pediatric Mechanical Ventilation is provided at the end of the semester.
  
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    RET 2874L - Clinical Practicum II - AS


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 1613C with a grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): RET 2234C, RET 2254C
    The second supervised clinical practice course for the Respiratory Care Program enables the students to develop appropriate psycho-motor and affective skills as they assist the therapist in respiratory procedures in both inpatient and outpatient situations. The development of patient assessment skills and advancement to increasingly acute patient care situations occurs throughout this Clinic.
  
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    RET 2875L - Clinical Practicum III - AS


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 2874L with a grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): RET 2264C, RET 2244
    This is the third of four courses for supervised clinical practice at an affiliated hospital. Areas of concentration in this critical care clinical course are arterial blood gasses, mechanical ventilation, ventilation monitoring, ECG monitoring, chest x-ray evaluation, intra-aortic balloon pumping, Swan-Ganz catheterization and monitoring, cardiac output determination, chest tube drainage, and airway management.
  
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    RET 2876L - Clinical Practicum IV - AS


    5 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 2875L, RET 2264C, and RET 2244--all with a grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): RET 2930
    Under supervision, the student actively participates in respiratory care measures in all areas of the acute care facility. Students maintain equipment, participate in emergency procedures and critical care procedures as well as observation rotations in the home care setting and physician pulmonology practice.  This last clinical practice course provides an internship environment prior to graduation and professional practice.
  
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    RET 2930 - Respiratory Care Practitioner as a Professional - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RET 2264C with a grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): RET 2876L
    In this course the professional relationship of the respiratory therapist is presented and a basic research format is emphasized with an added option of taking an ACLS class and NBRC Self Assessment Exams for both parts of the RRT board exam. The development of a professional resume, interviewing skills and medical ethics, for Respiratory Care Practice, are course requirements.
  
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    RET 4034 - Problems in Patient Management


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BAS Cardiopulmonary Sciences Program
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    This is a case-based course that identifies the problems associated with complex patient management issues in the diagnostic and acute care environments. This course will make use of discussion and guest instruction from Interdisciplinary Health Care professionals.

     

  
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    RET 4050 - Research Methods


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BAS Cardiopulmonary Sciences Program
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    The statistical analysis tools and organizational principles that underpin research practices for evidence-based medicine are surveyed. Specific literature-based examples are used to provide the basis for the presentation of research methods in clinical practice.

     

  
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    RET 4285 - Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics and Intervention


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BAS Cardiopulmonary Sciences program
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    Advanced invasive Cardiac and Pulmonary diagnostic techniques to include, but not be limited to, advanced cardiac catheterization lab procedures, intra vascular interventions, and related chemical and mechanical devices for Cardiopulmonary intervention are explored in depth.
  
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    RET 4445 - Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BAS Cardiopulmonary Sciences Program
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    Advanced invasive and non-invasive Cardiac and Pulmonary diagnostic procedures to include but not be limited to: cardiac catherization, electrophysiology, echocardiography, stress testing, pulmonary studies and sleep disorders, explored in depth.

     

  
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    RET 4505 - Chest Medicine


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BAS Cardiopulmonary Sciences Program
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    This course examines the development of a comprehensive treatment plan for specific Cardiac or Pulmonary disorders.
  
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    RET 4536 - Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BAS Cardiopulmonary Sciences Program
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    The sociological and medical-legal aspects of patient care are explored through discussion and situation analysis in this course with an emphasis on Cardiac and Pulmonary care issues.

     

  
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    RET 4715 - Advanced Neonatal Medicine


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BAS Cardiopulmonary Sciences Program
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    The principles that underlie fetal developmental and congenital pathology with an emphasis on advanced practice for neonatology and cardiac care are discussed and analyzed. The practice issues for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Catheterization Lab are also reviewed.

     

  
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    RET 4933 - Selected Topics in Cardiopulmonary Sciences


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BAS Cardiopulmonary Sciences Program
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    This class is designed to enable the student to analyze and present a specific contemporary problem(s) in adult critical care, cardiopulmonary departmental administration, or invasive Cardiology practice.

     

  
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    RMI 2001 - Principles of Risk Management


    3 credit(s)
    This course covers basic principles and concepts relating to risk management as it relates to personal and business environments. The major areas of instruction include property/casualty, life, and health.
  
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    RTE 1000 - Introduction to Radiography and Patient Care - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Radiologic Technology Program
    Corequisite(s): RTE 1503/1503L, RTE 1418
    This course is an overview of medical imaging and an investigation of patient care techniques applicable to the practicing radiographer. This course includes concepts on becoming a technologist, practicing the profession, and competently performing patient care in the medical environment.
  
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    RTE 1001 - Radiographic Terminology - AS


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Radiologic Technology Program
    This course is the study of the language of medicine which is commonly used in the field of Radiology. It includes the construction, analysis, spelling, application, and pronunciation of medical terms and how they relate to the structure and function of the human body. It explores the use of medical words and abbreviations used in Radiologic procedures, pathophysiology, and case histories.
  
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    RTE 1418 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure I - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Radiologic Technology Program
    Corequisite(s): RTE 1000, RTE 1503, RTE 1503L
    The course leads the learner through concepts related to radiographic imaging including: beam restriction, grids, radiographic film, processing, sensitometry, intensifying screens, quality factors, and conversion techniques involving manipulation of exposure parameters.
  
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    RTE 1457 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure II - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1613 with a grade of "C" or better
    Corequisite(s): RTE 1814
    A course designed to build upon the concepts learned in RTE 1613, Radiologic Physics, and RTE 1418, Principles of Radiographic Exposure I. The course leads the learner through concepts related to radiographic imaging including: film critique, exposure control systems including fixed and variable kilovoltage technique chart construction, automatic exposure control, and exposure conversion methods.
  
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    RTE 1503 - Radiographic Positioning I - AS


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Radiologic Technology Program
    Corequisite(s): RTE 1000, RTE 1503L, RTE 1418
    Students learn basic radiographic positioning for the chest, abdomen, upper, and lower extremities. Concepts include radiographic anatomy and film analysis. Radiation protection is stressed and demonstrated for each procedure.
  
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    RTE 1503L - Radiographic Positioning I Lab - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Radiologic Technology Program
    Corequisite(s): RTE 1000, RTE 1503, RTE 1418
    This course is designed to provide students with clinical experience in a supervised radiologic setting. The student will put into practice the theories discussed in the accompanying RTE courses. Clinical rotations through selected areas of the Radiology Department allow students to attain experience in patient transportation; operations of the department; radiography room equipment manipulation; image receptor handling and processing; accessory equipment usage; and patient care and safety. The student will demonstrate competence in basic chest and abdomen radiography and will observe and assist with basic radiographic procedures of the upper extremities, and lower extremities under direct supervision by a registered technologist.
  
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    RTE 1513 - Radiographic Positioning II - AS


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1503 and RTE 1503L--both with a grade of "C" or better
    Corequisite(s): RTE 1804
    Students learn basic radiographic positioning for the entire spine; bony thorax; upper gastrointestinal system; lower gastrointestinal system; genitourinary and biliary systems. Concepts include radiographic anatomy and film analysis. Radiation protection is stressed and demonstrated for each procedure.
  
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    RTE 1523 - Radiographic Positioning III - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1513 and RTE 1804--both with a grade of "C" or better
    Corequisite(s): RTE 1814
    Students learn basic radiographic positioning for the skull including facial bones, orbits, sinuses, temporomandibular joints, mandible, and nasal bones. Concepts include radiographic anatomy and film analysis. Radiation protection is stressed and demonstrated for each procedure.
  
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    RTE 1573 - Radiologic Science Principles - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1457 with a grade of "C" or better
    Corequisite(s): RTE 1824
    A course designed to acquaint students with advanced imaging concepts related to Radiologic Technology. Topics covered include: mobile radiography, fluoroscopy, tomography and basic physical concepts related to computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, mammography, and other imaging modalities. Students learn advanced radiographic procedures including venipuncture, trauma radiography, pediatric radiography, and foreign body localization. Special consideration is placed on positioning and exposure techniques that help the radiographer consistently obtain optimum images of human anatomy.
  
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    RTE 1613 - Radiographic Physics - AS


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1418 with a grade of "C" or better
    Corequisite(s): RTE 1804
    This course is a study of the fundamental units of measurement, the structure of matter, and the concepts of work, force, and energy. The course covers the following basics of electricity: electrostatics, electrodynamics, magnetism, and the electric generator. Concepts include electromagnetic induction, transformers, rectifiers, X-ray tubes, and the interactions that produce x-radiation. Radiation measurement and basic radiation protection concepts are also included.
  
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    RTE 1804 - Radiographic Practicum I - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1503L with a grade of "C" or higher
    This course is designed to provide students with clinical experience in a supervised radiologic setting. The student will put into practice the theories discussed in the accompanying RTE courses. Clinical rotations through selected areas of the Radiology Department and the operating room allow students to attain experience in radiography room equipment manipulation; image receptor handling and processing; accessory equipment usage; contrast media usage and preparation; patient care and safety; and surgical protocol and radiography. The student will demonstrate competence in advanced imaging of the chest, acute abdominal radiography, and radiographic procedures of the upper extremities and lower extremities. The student will observe and assist with radiographic fluoroscopic procedures, and radiographic procedures of the spine and bony thorax under direct supervision by a registered technologist. Students will maintain and increase their skill level on radiographic procedures in which they were previously deemed competent.
  
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    RTE 1814 - Radiographic Practicum II - AS


    3 credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide students with clinical experience in a supervised radiologic setting. The student will put into practice the theories discussed in the accompanying RTE courses. Clinical rotations through selected areas of the Radiology Department and the operating room allow students to attain increased proficiency in radiography room equipment manipulation; image receptor handling and processing; accessory equipment usage; contrast media usage and preparation; patient care and safety; and surgical protocol and radiography of more acute patients. The student will demonstrate competence in fluoroscopic procedures, mobile imaging of the chest and abdomen, trauma hip imaging, a selected ARRT radiographic procedure, and mobile fluoroscopic equipment manipulation. The student will observe and assist with mobile fluoroscopic procedures in the operating room, radiographic procedures of the cranium, facial bones, and bony thorax under direct supervision by a registered technologist. Students will also utilize critical thinking skills in the performance of advanced radiographic procedures (LII competency) previously deemed competent on difficult patients. Additionally, students will demonstrate problem solving techniques in the performance of radiographic procedures in which they were previously deemed competent on more acute patients.
  
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    RTE 1824 - Radiographic Practicum III - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1814 with a grade of "C" or better
    This course is designed to provide students with clinical experience in a supervised radiologic setting. The student will put into practice the theories discussed in the accompanying RTE courses. Clinical rotations through selected areas of the Radiology Department, CT suite, and the operating room allow students to attain increased proficiency and independence in radiography room equipment manipulation; image receptor handling and processing; accessory equipment usage; contrast media usage and preparation; patient care and safety; fluoroscopy procedures of more critical patients; surgical protocol and procedures; and advanced radiography of acute patients. The student will demonstrate competence in routine spine imaging, imaging of the bony thorax, trauma shoulder, and mobile C-arm procedure. Students will also utilize critical thinking skills in the performance of advanced radiographic procedures on difficult patients. These Level II competencies will include mobile imaging, fluoroscopic procedures, and an exam that is drawn from previous semester’s material that a student has proven competent. The student will observe and assist in imaging of the cranium, facial bones, and procedures performed in the CT suite.
  
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    RTE 1951 - Radiologic Technology Equivalency Assessment - AS


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    Equivalency Assessment is a process designed to assist Registered Radiologic Technologists who desire to earn the Associate in Science Degree in Radiologic Technology. These individuals are graduates of accredited, hospital-based, radiologic technology programs who are certified by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).
  
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    RTE 2061 - Radiologic Technology Seminar - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 2782, RTE 2473, RTE 2385--all with a grade of "C" or better
    This is a final, comprehensive course that reviews and inter-relates concepts previously covered in the two-year curriculum. It provides the student with a meaningful approach to evaluate previous learning and to investigate areas of needed preparation for employment and credentialing. The course also includes employment interview skills and related concepts such as resume preparation.
  
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    RTE 2385 - Radiation Biology and Protection - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1613 with a grade of "C" or better
    Corequisite(s): RTE 2834
    An examination of radiation safety issues related to the Radiologic Technology profession. Emphasis is given to concepts that increase one’s awareness of the responsibility to protect the public and self from unnecessary radiation dose.
  
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    RTE 2473 - Quality Assurance - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1418 with a grade of "C" or better
    Corequisite(s): RTE 2834
    A course designed to introduce the radiography student to evaluation methodology of radiographic systems to assure consistency in the production of quality images at the lowest dose.
  
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    RTE 2563 - Special Radiographic Procedures and Cross-Sectional Anatomy - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1523 with a grade of "C" or better
    Corequisite(s): RTE 1824
    This course is an investigation of the anatomy, equipment, and techniques for special radiographic procedures. Included are angiographic, neuroradiographic, and interventional procedures. Infrequent, but interesting studies are also covered such as lymphography and sialography. Included in this course is an 8-week in-depth study of cross-sectional anatomy as demonstrated by digital imaging techniques.
  
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    RTE 2782 - Radiographic Pathology - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 2563 with a grade of "C" or better
    This course is the study of disease processes of the human body and how they are identified radiographically. The pathology of each major body system and the imaging methods and procedures used for diagnosis are explored.
  
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    RTE 2834 - Radiology Practicum IV - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 1824 with a grade of "C" or better
    This course is designed to provide students with clinical experience in a supervised radiologic setting. The student will put into practice the theories discussed in the accompanying RTE courses. Clinical rotations through selected areas of the Radiology Department, Angiography suite, and the operating room allow students to attain increased proficiency and independence in radiography room equipment manipulation; image receptor handling and processing; accessory equipment usage; contrast media usage and preparation; patient care and safety; and surgical protocol and radiography of more acute patients. The student will demonstrate competence in radiographic procedures of the cranium, facial bones, pediatric imaging of the chest, trauma cervical spine imaging, a selected ARRT radiographic procedure, and a special procedure category. Students will also utilize critical thinking skills in the performance of advanced radiographic procedures on difficult patients. These Level II competencies will include mobile orthopedic imaging, operating room radiologic procedure, and a trauma upper and lower extremity exam that are drawn from previous semester’s material in which a student has proven competent. Additionally, students will demonstrate problem solving techniques in the performance of radiographic procedures in which they were previously deemed competent on more acute patients.
  
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    RTE 2844 - Radiographic Practicum V - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): RTE 2834 with a grade of "C" or better
    This course is designed to provide students with clinical experience in a supervised radiologic setting. The student will put into practice the theories discussed in the accompanying RTE courses. Clinical rotations through selected areas of the Radiology Department, operating room, and optional rotations through MRI, Ultrasound, Nuclear Medicine, CT, and Special Procedures. These rotations allow students to attain increased proficiency and independence in radiography room equipment manipulation; image receptor handling and processing; accessory equipment usage; contrast media usage and preparation; patient care and safety; and surgical protocol and advanced radiography of acute patients. Students will also utilize critical thinking skills in the performance of more advanced radiographic procedures (LII competency) on difficult patients. These Level II competencies will include mobile imaging of an acute care patient, a more complex operating room radiologic procedure, and an exam performed in the radiology department drawn from previous five semester’s material in which a student has proven competent. Additionally, students will demonstrate advanced problem-solving techniques in the performance of radiographic procedures in which they were previously deemed competent on more acute patients.
  
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    SBM 2000 - Small Business Management


    3 credit(s)
    Small business firms constitute an important part of today’s business system. This course focuses on the need for small business firms to anticipate and adjust promptly to significant shifts, customer demands, competitors’ actions and public expectations. Emphasis is on improving the quality of small firm management and should contribute to the success of individual firms.
  
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    SCE 1949 - Science Internship I


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): 6 credit hours of discipline specific coursework (courses in the 1000 or 2000 levels with prefixes of AST, BSC, CHM, GLY, ISC, MCB, OCB, OCE, PCB, PHY) each completed with a grade of "C" or higher; 15 completed program hours (in AA General Education) or permission of Dean.
    This course offers a cooperative program between Edison State College, students, and local employers.  This course requires verified work hours and a written summary report at the end of the work experience.
  
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    SCE 2949 - Science Internship II


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): SCE 1949 with a grade of "C" or higher
    This course offers a cooperative program between Edison State College, students, and local employers/volunteer organizations.  This course requires verified work hours and a written summary report at the end of the work experience.
  
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    SCE 3320C - Teaching Biology & Other Life Sciences in Middle School with Practicum


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in Education program or special permission from the Dean of the School of Education; EDG 4004, EDG 3410, and EDM 3230--all with a grade of "C" or higher.
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    Required: This course requires 35 hours of practicum in a 5-9 classroom setting over a minimum of ten weeks.
    This course covers techniques and materials of instruction for teaching science in the middle grades (5-9). In this course, teacher candidates learn principles of effective curriculum design and assessment and apply these principles by designing and developing interactive biological and life science curriculum projects and assessments for middle school students. This course addresses specific Next Generation State Standards, subject matter competencies, and pedagogy pertinent to the discipline and required for certification. This course requires thirty-five (35) hours of practicum in a 5-9 classroom setting.
 

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