Apr 22, 2021  
2013-2014 Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    NUR 2260L - Advanced Adult Nursing II Clinical - AS


    0 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Nursing Program
    Corequisite(s): NUR 2260, NUR 2530
    Clinical learning experiences provide students with the opportunity to further develop their roles as providers of care, managers of care, and professionals within the discipline of nursing.
  
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    NUR 2310 - Pediatric Nursing Concepts - AS


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ((NUR 1204/1204L) or (NUR 1211/1211L)), and DEP 2004 and PSY 2012--all with a letter grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): NUR 2310L, NUR 2523
    A developmental approach is utilized to study the nursing care of the child from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is on wellness, growth and development, and the nursing care of the child with alterations in physical and mental health.
  
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    NUR 2310L - Pediatric Nursing Clinical - AS


    0 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ((NUR 1204/1204L) or (NUR 1211/1211L)), and DEP 2004, and PSY 2012--all with a letter grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): NUR 2310, NUR 2523
    The clinical setting provides the student with the opportunity to develop his/her role as provider of care, manager of care, and professional within the discipline of nursing as it relates to the care of children.
  
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    NUR 2424 - Maternal Nursing Concepts - AS


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ((NUR 1204/1204L) or (NUR 1211/1211L)), and DEP 2004, and PSY 2012--all with a letter grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): NUR 2424L
    This course focuses on the nursing care of childbearing women and their families through all stages of pregnancy and childbirth, as well as care of the newborn. Emphasis is on the process of labor, birth, and recovery, teaching about pregnancy, and parenting skills. An overview of women's health issues is also included.
  
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    NUR 2424L - Maternal Nursing Clinical - AS


    0 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): ((NUR 1204/1204L) or (NUR 1211/1211L)), and DEP 2004, and PSY 2012--all with a letter grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): NUR 2424
    The clinical setting provides the student with the opportunity to care for women and to prepare women for childbirth as well as develop the roles of the nurse as provider of care, manager of care, and professional within the discipline of nursing. Mental health concepts will be integrated throughout the course and these concepts will be applied to patient care.
  
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    NUR 2523 - Mental Health Concepts Across the Lifespan - AS


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): NUR 1511 with a grade of "C" or higher
    Corequisite(s): NUR 2310/2310L
    This second mental health course assists the students in understanding dynamics of human behavior and acquiring knowledge of mental health concepts related to anxiety and to mental health disorders common at specific periods across the lifespan. This course builds on mental health concepts taught in the introductory course. Select mental health experiences and activities will be incorporated into NUR 2310L, Pediatric Nursing Concepts, for Basic and Advanced Placement students. These clinical learning experiences will provide students with the opportunity to further develop their roles as provider of care, manager of care, and professional within the discipline of nursing. This course requires students to utilize some basic computer skills and computer-assisted instruction.
  
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    NUR 2530 - Nursing for Clients with Major Mental Health Disorders - AS


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Nursing Program
    Corequisite(s): NUR 2260/2260L
    This third mental health course assists students in understanding dynamics of human behavior and acquiring knowledge of mental health concepts related to major mental health disorders, including Mood Disorders, Schizophrenia, and Substance Abuse. This course builds on mental health concepts taught in the first two courses in the series. Select mental health experiences and activities will be incorporated into NUR 2260L, Advanced Adult Nursing II, for Basic and Advanced Placement students. These clinical learning experiences will provide students with the opportunity to further develop their roles as provider of care, manager of care, and professional within the discipline of nursing. NUR 2530 may require students to utilize some basic computer skills and computer-assisted instruction.
  
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    NUR 2810 - Professional Issues and Role Development - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Nursing Program
    This course is designed to facilitate the transition of the student to entry level practitioner. An overview of trends and issues in nursing and health care delivery is presented. The course explores legal-ethical issues, management and leadership concepts, and issues related to employment in nursing.
  
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    NUR 2941L - Clinical Preceptorship - AS


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): All nursing courses and general education requirements for the A.S. Degree--all with a letter grade of "C" or higher
    The focus of the clinical experience is on the progression of the student from the educational setting and student role to functioning within the reality of the work place in a professional role. This Level 2 Clinical Preceptorship teams a student with a registered nurse mentor for an in-depth clinical experience. Students are provided an opportunity to synthesize and utilize knowledge gained during their educational experience while functioning in the role of provider of care. Opportunities are provided for students to participate as a manager of client care and to observe basic management functions. Students are required to complete this Level 2, ninety-six (96) hour Clinical Preceptorship during the final month in the Nursing Program. This course may require some basic computer skills and CE6.
  
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    NUR 3066C - Advanced Health Assessment


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of "C" or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This course focuses on a holistic approach to health assessment of clients across the life span. Emphasis is placed on communication skills, health history, a review of body systems, and physical examination techniques. Assessment of risk factors and level of health functioning are analyzed and interpreted. Advanced practice health assessment skills are developed and refined through laboratory experiences. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 3125 - Pathophysiology for Nursing Practice


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This course builds upon the student’s knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, nursing science, genetics, and growth and development. An in-depth integration of normal and altered physiological and pathologic mechanisms of body systems and life span development and dysfunction are examined. A variety of episodic and chronic health challenges from individual, family, and community perspectives will be explored. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 3145 - Pharmacology and Alternative Therapeutics


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This course builds on the student’s knowledge of pharmacology and therapeutics. Major categories of pharmacological agents and alternative, nutritional and complimentary therapies are explored. Application of pharmacologic concepts, drug interactions, legal responsibilities, and nursing considerations are examined. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 3655 - Multicultural Nursing


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.
    This course is an elective offering in the RN/BSN program. The course examines the ethnic and cultural influences on beliefs, values, and practices in relation to health, illness, and health-seeking behaviors. Application of the nursing process and strategies to provide culturally competent care to clients and communities with respect to cultural norms, diversity, and individual differences are addressed. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 3805 - Professional Roles and Dimensions


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This introductory course is designed for the returning RN and focuses on the issues and theories related to current professional nursing practice. The evolution of nursing as a profession and the role of the professional nurse are examined. An overview of selected nursing theorists and professional nursing practice in a dynamic health care delivery system are presented. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.

    Note: Taken in the first 9 credit hours of the RN/BSN program.

  
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    NUR 3826 - Legal Ethical Aspects in Nursing


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This course focuses on the areas of professional liability as it relates to negligence, intentional torts, and client consent. The role of the nurse is explored as it relates to patient advocacy and risk management. The student is introduced to the principles underlying legal and ethical issues and methods of rational decision-making related to healthcare. Critical laws and issues related to current professional practice are explored as follows: the moral foundations of professional practice; the elements of ethical decision-making; and maintaining ethical practice climates in healthcare delivery systems. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 3870 - Informatics for the Health Professional


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This course focuses on information technologies and systems that support decision making and nursing care in current nursing practice. Computer techniques, the World Wide Web, and lit servers as they relate to nursing practice and basic research are examined. Security and confidentiality as they relate to HIPPA, telehealth, and electronic health records (EHR) will be explored. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.

    Note: Taken in the first 9 credit hours of the RN/BSN program.

  
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    NUR 3895 - Teaching and Learning for the Healthcare Professional


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of "C" or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This course is an elective offering in the RN/BSN program. This course provides an introduction to the processes of health education, teaching, learning, and evaluation. The students will develop objectives and learning outcomes as well as explore various teaching and learning strategies and methodologies applicable to individuals and groups of learners in a variety of settings across the lifespan. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 4165 - Nursing Research


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): STA 2023 (or higher) and NUR 3870, with a grade of "C" or higher
    Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license.
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This course provides an introduction to scientific inquiry and the research process in nursing and enables the student to understand and use published research. Scholarly inquiry, scientific integrity, scientific investigation, and research as it pertains to evidence-based nursing practice are explored. Issues and problems and the systematic evaluation of reports of empirical research are discussed. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 4169 - Evidence Based Nursing Practice


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license.
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of "C" or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This course is an elective offering in the RN/BSN program. Exploration and integration of current scientific evidence, use of clinical judgment, identification of patient preferences, and assessment of available resources are the conceptual elements used to promote clinical practice decision making. This course explores the concepts of critical analysis and outcomes research, emphasizing the elements of evidence based nursing practice. Focus is placed on utilization of research in clinical practice, and the student will examine and plan a resolution of a clinical nursing problem. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 4295 - Critical Care Nursing


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license.
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This course is an elective offering in the RN/BSN program. The course examines the needs of the critically ill client, focusing on the development of knowledge, techniques, and skills needed for the delivery of complex nursing care to clients experiencing health problems requiring critical care interventions. Emphasis is on the use of evidence-based practice and critical thinking while applying the nursing process to provide and manage care for the client and family. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 4636 - Community Health Nursing Theory


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license; completion of all of the RN/BSN Program courses (except NUR 4636L and NUR 4827/4827L).
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    Corequisite(s): NUR 4636L
    This course focuses on the promotion of health and the holistic nursing role in the community. The student is introduced to community nursing practice, concepts of community assessment, health promotion, health maintenance, disease prevention, and health education. The nursing care of clients across the lifespan is explored with attention given to the community as client. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 4636L - Community Health Nursing Practicum


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license; completion of all of the RN/BSN Program courses (except NUR 4636 and NUR 4827/4827L).
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    Corequisite(s): NUR 4636
    This course is a corequisite with NUR 4636, Community Health Nursing Theory, and applies the concepts presented in that course in a variety of community health settings. The nursing care of clients across the lifespan is explored with attention given to the community as client. The course provides experiences with a preceptor and focuses on community assessment and teaching for the promotion of health, health maintenance, and prevention of illness. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete practicum experiences with a preceptor along with specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 4827 - Leadership in Nursing


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license; completion of all RN/BSN Program courses (except NUR 4827L and NUR 4636/4636L).
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    Corequisite(s): NUR 4827L
    This course focuses on the theory, concepts, and underlying principles of management and leadership in health care delivery systems. The methods and interpersonal skills to become an effective nurse manager/leader in various health care delivery systems are explored along with the concepts of professional organizations, decision making, power, authority, roles, health care legislation, problem-solving, evaluation, work groups, and leader behaviors. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 4827L - Leadership in Nursing Practicum


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license; completion of all RN/BSN Program courses (except NUR 4827 and NUR 4636/4636L).
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of "C" or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    Corequisite(s): NUR 4827
    This course applies the theories, concepts, and underlying principles of management and leadership in health care delivery systems presented in NUR 4827. The methods, management/leadership strategies, and interpersonal skills to become an effective nurse manager/leader in various health care delivery systems are explored with clinical experiences in a variety of healthcare settings. This course requires students to complete practicum experiences with a preceptor along with specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    NUR 4847 - Clinical Decision Making


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): NUR 3125 with a grade of "C" or higher; acceptance into the RN/BSN Program; current, valid, unencumbered RN license.
    This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and STA 2023 with grades of “C” or higher. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page.

    This course emphasizes critical thinking and clinical judgment of the professional nurse. The decision making role of the nurse to affect desired client outcomes in a variety of settings is examined. Critical thinking skills and the ability to utilize the nursing process in clinical decision making are emphasized. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities.
  
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    OCB 1000C - The Living Ocean


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all Developmental courses
    A study of the living ocean presented within the context of marine biology and biological oceanography, two closely related albeit distinct fields. This course emphasizes the basic scientific processes that affect marine ecosystems and the organisms in the sea. Using the delicate marine environment of Southwest Florida as a natural laboratory, students will have the opportunity to apply the concepts learned in the classroom to the field.

    Note: This course was formerly OCB 1001C.

  
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    OCB 2010 - Marine Biology


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): (BSC 1010/1010L or one year of high school biology) with a "C" or better and successful completion of all Developmental courses
    Corequisite(s): OCB 2010L
    This course is an introduction to the biology of the sea with an emphasis on the structural, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of marine life. Discussions will center on organisms from the smallest microbes to the largest marine vertebrates and the roles they play in marine ecosystems. Special attention will be paid to the delicate communities of Southwest Florida, including mangrove forests and coral reefs.
  
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    OCB 2010L - Marine Biology Laboratory


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): (BSC 1010/1010L or one year of high school biology) with a "C" or better and successful completion of all Developmental courses
    Corequisite(s): OCB 2010
    This laboratory course complements the lecture-based course OCB 2010: Marine Biology, which examines the biological adaptations and diversity of life of the sea. Marine organisms and delicate Southwest Florida ecosystems will be studied through both hands-on laboratory activities and field trips.
  
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    OCE 1001C - Introduction to Oceanography


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all Developmental courses
    An interdisciplinary exploration of the world’s ocean presented in a combined lecture-lab format. This course emphasizes the basic scientific processes that govern the ocean and focuses on the classic disciplines of geological, physical, and chemical oceanography. Using the delicate marine environment of Southwest Florida as a natural laboratory, students will have the opportunity to apply the concepts learned in the classroom to the field.
  
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    OPT 1000 - Ophthalmic Orientation


    1 credit(s)
    This course presents an introduction to the field of vision care, including opticianry, optometry, ophthalmology and optical manufacturing. Topics include ophthalmic history, legal and ethical principles, patient history, terminology and abbreviations. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 1155 - Ophthalmic Lens I


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides a brief history of the development of glass and plastic lenses, the various sphere, cylinder and prism powers, the use of optical cross, flat and toric transposition, and the aberrations of lenses. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 1156 - Ophthalmic Lens II


    3 credit(s)
    This course continues the study of optical theory. Topics include: prism notation; vertical imbalance and methods of correcting for it; vertex power; luminance; reflection and absorption; diffraction; third-order lens aberrations, and lens tilt; anisometropia, and spectacle magnification. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 1225 - Low Vision


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides a definition of visual impairment and methods used to measure its severity. A description of the most common causes of visual impairment will be presented. Treatment plans including optical and non-optical aids will be reviewed. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 1400L - Ophthalmic Lab I


    3 credit(s)
    This course introduces the student to terms, instruments, lenses, frames, and materials to be used in the surfacing and finishing of ophthalmic prescription eyewear. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 1430L - Ophthalmic Lab II


    3 credit(s)
    This course introduces the student to terms, instruments, lenses, frames, and materials to be used in the finishing process and handwork of ophthalmic prescription eyewear. This course is a continuation of Ophthalmic Laboratory I. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 1460 - Ophthalmic Dispensing I


    3 credit(s)
    This course introduces the student to the skills necessary for becoming a dispensing optician. Included are the history of the profession, patient/client measurements, frames and lens materials, frame and lens selection, prescription, prescription analysis, and adjustment techniques. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 1460L - Ophthalmic Dispensing Lab I


    3 credit(s)
    This course is designed to introduce the students to the practical dispensing of optical products. The students will perform competencies related to the neutralization of single vision lenses and multifocal lenses for duplication, measurement of frames and mountings, and the measurement of PD’s. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 1666 - Safety and Sports Vision


    3 credit(s)
    Opticians are constantly requested to provide eyewear that will better protect, improve and enhance vision for occupational and recreational activities. This course will present the visual requirements for common occupations and sports. It will also discuss spectacle, contact lens, and non-optical solutions to safety and sports vision problems. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2030 - Ophthalmic Board Review


    1 credit(s)
    This course provides a comprehensive review and update of opticianry dispensing in preparation for the Florida State Board of Opticianry examination. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2204 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Eye


    3 credit(s)
    This course investigates the anatomical structure of the eye and the function of its parts as they pertain to the process of vision. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2375 - Refractometry


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to instruct the students in the theory of refractometry and testing for visual acuity. It will include identifying ametropias, the etiology and distribution of refractive errors and anomalies of binocular vision. The steps in performing retinoscopy, objective and subjective refraction procedures will be covered. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2375L - Refractometry Lab


    2 credit(s)
    This course is a continuation of OPT 2375. It is designed to introduce the students to the procedures of an objective and subjective refraction. Students will perform competencies related to retinoscopy, patient history, binocular balance and subjective testing for visual acuity. This is primarily a hands-on course. The students will gain practice in testing VA (cc and sc), retinoscopy, subjective refraction and binocular balancing in a clinically safe environment. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2376L - Refractometry Lab II


    1 credit(s)
    This course is a continuation of OPT 2375L. It is designed to fine tune the procedures of objective and subjective refractions. Students will perform competencies related to measuring visual acuity and taking a patient history, retinoscopy (review), confrontations and EOM’s, pupillary functions, balance and binocular/phoria/tropia testing. This is primarily a hands-on course to help the students gain speed and accuracy in performing objective and subjective refractions. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2461 - Ophthalmic Dispensing II


    3 credit(s)
    This course presents ophthalmic instruments and devices; analysis of absorptive lenses; computing and compensation of vertical imbalance; discussion of ethics and legal issues; record keeping and communications; optical salesmanship, and visual impairment. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2461L - Ophthalmic Dispensing Lab II


    3 credit(s)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the practical aspects of frame alignments and adjustments, and the insertion and removal of lenses from various frames. The course includes further instruction and practice on neutralization of lenses for verification and duplication of an Rx order, measure and calipering of lenses and frames, the facial measurements of orders (PD and seg heights), frame repair and the identification of various types of lenses. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2463L - Ophthalmic Skills Lab I


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to educate students in the technical skills of performing various procedures within the ophthalmic visual assessment area of a dispensary. The course will present technical equipment procedures, maintenance and use, as well as the skills needed in assisting Optometrists and patients with various procedures such as administering medicines and pharmacology identification and uses. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2500 - Contact Lens Theory I


    3 credit(s)
    This course includes a historical review as well as theory; design and optical principle of contact lenses; indications and contraindications for contact lens wear; patient evaluation; discussion of lens types and availability; fundamental techniques and fitting philosophies including the role of the biomicroscope, keratometer and radiuscope; patient education on care, cleaning, insertion and removal of contact lenses. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2500L - Contact Lens I Lab


    2 credit(s)
    Students will perform competencies related to the handling of instruments and charts used in the fitting and designing of contact lenses. Students will also learn about the handling and evaluation of contact lenses by the fitter and the patient. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2501 - Contact Lens Theory II


    2 credit(s)
    Emphasizes contact lens verification, dispensing, and follow up care. The fitting of astigmatic, presbyopic, and special needs patients will also be covered. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2501L - Contact Lens II Lab


    2 credit(s)
    Students will perform competencies related to the design, inspection, modification, evaluation and dispensing of spherical contact lenses. The fitting of astigmatic, presbyopic, and other special lens patients will also be covered. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2502L - Contact Lens Lab III


    1 credit(s)
    This course is an advanced hands-on experience in fitting contact lenses. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2800L - Vision Care Clinical I


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to allow students to apply knowledge gained in lectures and laboratories to clinical situations. Depending on the placement, the student may utilize skills related to management, fabrication, dispensing, contact lenses or visual assessment. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2801L - Vision Care Clinical II


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to allow students to apply knowledge gained in lectures and laboratories to clinical situations. Depending on the placement, the student may utilize skills related to management, fabrication, dispensing, contact lenses or visual assessment. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2802L - Vision Care Clinical III


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to allow students to apply knowledge gained in lectures and laboratories to clinical situations. Depending on the placement, the student may utilize skills related to management, fabrication, dispensing, contact lenses or visual assessment. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2803L - Vision Care Clinical IV


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to allow students to apply knowledge gained in lectures and laboratories to clinical situations. Depending on the placement, the student may utilize skills related to management, fabrication, dispensing, contact lenses or visual assessment. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    OPT 2910 - Directed Research


    3 credit(s)
    This course covers the research, planning and development of an optical dispensary. Topics include the type, size, location and design, as well as financing, business structure, taxes, licenses and equipment. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree.
  
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    PAD 2949 - Public Safety Administration Internship I


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 18 college-level credit hours with a grade of "C" or better in one of the following public safety disciplines: Crime Scene, Criminal Justice, EMS, Fire Science
    This course is a supervised field experience. Internship placement is arranged by the student, in partnership with the affiliated college department, in conjunction with public safety affiliated employers, such as criminal justice, fire science, or EMS agencies. This course will provide an opportunity for the student to observe the public safety agency in operation. Students will be expected to compare classroom theory with the day-to-day operation of the public safety agency to which they are assigned, including the roles and responsibilities of the professional in the field. Students will be required to complete 135 hours of supervised work. Student experiences will be documented and evaluated by the employer/supervisor and the professor.
  
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    PAD 3003 - Introduction to Public Administration


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course provides a common foundation to students for understanding administration in the public sector. Among the themes, issues, and structures of public administration, the student will explore: the political system, the role of federalism and local government, bureaucratic politics and power, administrative law, ethics, and the various theories of administration that guide public managers. This course must be taken during the first semester of enrollment in the program.
  
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    PAD 3113 - Executive Leadership


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    The purpose of this course is to provide a common foundation to students for understanding the role of the contemporary political executive with an emphasis on leadership, organization, personality and power, ideology, relationships, decision making, and policy creation.
  
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    PAD 3204 - Financial Management in the Public Sector


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course is an introduction to budgeting in the public and non-profit sectors. The course concentrates on developing budget knowledge and skills essential for successful management performance.
  
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    PAD 3393 - Principles of Crisis and Emergency Management


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course is an introduction to all phases of emergency management – from the social and environmental processes that generate hazards to vulnerability analysis, hazard mitigation, emergency response, and disaster recovery.
  
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    PAD 3711 - Technology in the Public Sector


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course examines the issues related to managing digital technology in the public sector. This course introduces students to e-government applications, including planning, procurement, implementation, evaluation, and limitations of information technologies.
  
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    PAD 3820 - Public Safety System Integration


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course compares and contrasts the various components of the public safety sector. The course examines the working relationship between public safety organizations and the effectiveness of the various service delivery models.
  
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    PAD 3874 - Community Relations – Theory and Practice


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course will expose the student to community relations theory and practice within a broad range of public safety organizations. Students will understand why positive community perception of public safety is critical to funding and operational effectiveness. The students will explore the public safety responsibility in establishing business continuity both in preplanning and following a disaster. Each student will gain the insight and skills necessary to be effective in the community relations function of public safety administration.
  
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    PAD 4034 - Public Policy


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course is designed to provide students with a broad perspective of the public policy process. Students will learn how public policies are initiated, researched, developed, implemented, and analyzed. Basic policy implementation will be explored, including the planning, analyzing, and resolution of issues at the local, state, and federal levels.
  
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    PAD 4232 - Grant and Contract Management


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course is a study of public agency grant and contract administration. Topics include alternate funding sources, grant preparation, and application processes. The course addresses legal and ethical considerations in grant and contract management.
  
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    PAD 4332 - Strategic and Operational Planning


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course is an introduction to how emergency managers use objective information to design, direct, and improve emergency services as well as plan AND facilitate results-based policy decisions.
  
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    PAD 4414 - Human Resources in Public Service


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course is an introduction to the history of government employment and the structure and role of the American Civil Service. It explores the role of personnel policies and the rights and responsibilities of public servants and their effect on public service on American society.
  
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    PAD 4426 - Public Sector Labor Relations


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course analyses bargaining and negotiating in political and academic content and provides a practical guide to those involved in contract negotiations. The course examines the skills needed to resolve disputes in the public sector through facilitation, mediation, and other alternative methods.
  
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    PAD 4442 - Public Relations


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    The course studies the complex field of educating the public and responding to public concerns. Students will design integrated plans and develop professional contacts within the public safety system.
  
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    PAD 4604 - Regulatory Policy and Administrative Law in the Public Safety Sector


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course examines the issues of administrative ethics in public service. Topics include public integrity, ethics codes, administrative discretion, secrecy and sunshine laws, organizational pressures, and policies on whistle-blowing.
  
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    PAD 4878 - Public Safety Administration Capstone


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): All General Education Core and Public Safety Degree Core coursework must be completed prior to enrollment. Public Safety Administration elective courses and foreign language courses may be taken concurrently.
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    During the course, the student will complete a professional project applying the knowledge gained from the core courses under the direction of a professor. Successful completion of the course requires demonstration of achievement of program learning outcomes. Student and professor feedback regarding the program will be obtained during the course and used for program improvement.
  
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    PAD 4932 - Contemporary Issues in Public Safety


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.
    This course addresses a contemporary theme relevant to Public Safety Administration. The theme will be determined by consultation with students and safety agency leaders. Topics will address global or multidisciplinary issues in the field of public safety.
  
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    PAD 4949 - Public Safety Administration Internship II


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of eighteen (18) credit hours (“C” or higher) of PAD (Public Administration, or Public Safety Administration) coursework.
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    This course is a supervised field experience. Internship placement is arranged by the student, in partnership with the affiliated college department, in conjunction with public safety affiliated employers, such as criminal justice, fire science, or EMS agencies. This course will provide an opportunity for the student to observe the public safety agency in operation. The student will be expected to compare classroom theory with the day-to-day operation of the public safety agency to which they are assigned, including the roles and responsibilities of the professional in the field. Students will be required to complete 135 hours of supervised work. Student experiences will be documented and evaluated by the employer/supervisor and the professor.
  
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    PCB 3023C - Cell Biology


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): BSC 1010/1010L (Biological Science I with Lab); BSC 1011/1011L (Biological Science II with Lab)--all with a grade of "C" or higher.
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    This course offers a detailed examination into the molecular and cellular concepts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The cell theory, cell organization, and various cellular processes and metabolic pathways including the cell cycle, meiosis, respiration, photosynthesis, DNA replication, and protein synthesis will be explored. Consideration will also be given to viruses, pathogens, advances in DNA technology, and contemporary laboratory techniques.
  
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    PCB 3043C - General Ecology with Lab


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): BSC 1010/1010L and BSC 1011/1011L and CHM 2045/2045L-- all with a grade of "C" or higher.
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    This course covers the basic concepts of ecology, providing an introduction to living systems at the population, community, ecosystem, and landscape levels. Laboratory and field experiences are fully intergrated into the course to support an inquiry-based study of ecological concepts through active learning strategies. Current technologies for use with ecological experimental design, data management and analysis, computer simulation modeling, and GIS applications will be employed.
  
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    PCB 3063C - Genetics


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): BSC 1010/1010L and BSC 1011/1011L and CHM 2045/2045L-- all with a grade of "C" or higher.
    Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with a grade of “C” or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission from the appropriate academic dean.

    This combined lecture/lab course examines fundamental properties of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. It is designed to meet the requirements for upper division majors in biology, secondary education, or other pre-professional programs. The course addresses and intergrates the basic concepts associated with the nature, organization, transmission, expression, recombination, and function of genetic materials. Consideration will also be given to population genetics, evolution, and modern advances in DNA technology.
  
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    PGY 1800C - Introduction to Digital Photography


    3 credit(s)
    Requirement: Student must have access to a digital camera with manual controls
    This course gives the learner a complete exposure to the fundamentals of photography as applied to digital image making, including optical principles, camera operation, lighting considerations, composition, digital image manipulation (the virtual darkroom), image management, metadata considerations, and issues of deployment on the World Wide Web. Course includes weekly assignments of hands-on field photography exercises for online submission and critique. Prospective students should have basic knowledge of the use of computers and have access to a digital camera with manual controls.
  
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    PGY 1801C - Advanced Digital Photography


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PGY 1800C; digital camera with manual capability or permission of the instructor
    Requirement: Students must have access to a tripod and a digital camera with manual focus
    capability and manual exposure controls.

    This course continues the development of skills studied and acquired in the prerequisite PGY 1800C. The learner will study and apply sophisticated techniques of photography, digital photo editing and image management to her or his imaging work flow. Emphasis is placed on creative processes in planning and executing the photo shoot as well as post-shoot processing. Students will improve their skills in each area with intensive field photography projects and peer review of weekly photo assignments.
  
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    PGY 2401C - Photography I


    4 credit(s)
    Required: a manual 35mm camera and the purchase of darkroom supplies
    Photography I is an introduction to basic aspects of black and white photography. The camera, lighting, film processing, printing, and presentation will be studied. Technical printing as well as the aesthetics of photography will be emphasized. This course requires a manual 35mm camera and the purchase of darkroom supplies.
  
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    PGY 2404C - Photography II


    4 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PGY 2401C with a grade of "D" or higher, or permission of instructor
    This course is a continuation of PGY 2401C--Photography I. It is designed to further develop an aesthetic and technical approach to black and white still photography.
     
  
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    PHI 2010 - Introduction to Philosophy


    3 credit(s)
    This is a basic course in philosophical thinking. Selected readings from Socrates to Sartre are included.
  
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    PHI 2100 - Logic: Reasoning and Critical Thinking


    3 credit(s)
    This is a basic course in methods and principles in the development of correct reasoning.
  
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    PHI 2103 - Critical Thinking


    3 credit(s)
    A course in practical reasoning designed to sharpen abilities at analyzing, evaluating, and constructing arguments. To assist in decision-making, there will be an appraisal of the evaluation of evidence, practice in the detection of fallacies and irrelevancies, and the testing of arguments for validity and reliability. Students will also learn to examine assumptions, question socratically, and analyze experiences and perspectives. These strategies will be applied to a number of real life situations.
  
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    PHI 2600 - Ethics


    3 credit(s)
    This course is a basic course in philosophical thinking about morality, moral problems, and moral judgments.
  
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    PHT 1010 - Physical Principles for the Physical Therapist Assistant


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 1103L
    Corequisite(s): PHT 1211
    Course introduces the student to the basic physical principles that apply to commonly utilized therapeutic procedures in the field of physical therapy. Topics include but are not limited to body mechanics, ergonomics, and the use of heat, cold, sound and electricity to facilitate healing.
  
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    PHT 1020 - Therapeutic Communication for the Physical Therapy Assistant


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 1801L, PHT 1010
    Corequisite(s): PHT 2224
    An overview of effective communication skills and concepts regarding successful therapeutic interactions will be presented. Students will participate in several interactive sessions to become familiar with team building, verbal and non-verbal communication requirements, effective listening concepts, and conflict management to determine how to manage clinical situations as they arise. Cultural diversity is discussed. Students are responsible for developing an in-service presentation as a means of enhancing effectiveness of communication.
  
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    PHT 1103 - Anatomy for Physical Therapist Assistant


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: BSC 1094C
    Corequisite: PHT 1200

    This course introduces basic human anatomy with an emphasis on the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems. Actions, origins, insertions and innervations of muscles are discussed. Surface anatomy is presented with an introduction to basic palpation.
  
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    PHT 1103L - Anatomy for Physical Therapist Assistant Lab


    1 credit(s)
    Corequisite(s): PHT 1103, PHT 1200L
    Laboratory sessions for Anatomy for PTA (PHT 1103) are designed to provide the students with an opportunity to identify, with accuracy, a variety of bones, bony landmarks, muscles, ligaments and other soft tissue structures using graphics and various anatomical specimens/models. Basic palpation skills are developed. Practical examinations are completed.
  
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    PHT 1200 - Introduction to Physical Therapy


    3 credit(s)
    Corequisite(s): PHT 1300, PHT 1200L
    Course introduces the student to the historical background, philosophy and goals of physical therapy as a profession. It incorporates discussion on legal and ethical issues, educational requirements, supervisory relationships and current developments related to physical therapy. Health care delivery systems, the medical record and issues of reimbursement are discussed. Presents the basic theory of preparing the patient and treatment area, positioning and transfer training, gait training and wheelchair prescription, and other common physical therapy interventions. Professional behaviors are introduced at the beginning level and are assessed.
  
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    PHT 1200L - Introduction to Physical Therapy Lab


    1 credit(s)
    Corequisite(s): PHT 1103L, PHT 1200
    Laboratory sessions for Introduction to Physical Therapy (PHT 1200) are designed to allow the students an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the basic fundamentals of patient care. Emphasis is placed on body mechanic analysis, positioning procedures, transfer training, gait training, and basic patient preparation skills and other common physical therapy interventions. Case studies of various medical conditions with emphasis in these areas are completed. Data collection relative to the course content as well as patient and caregiver education are emphasized. Practical examinations are completed.
  
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    PHT 1211 - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures I


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 1103, PHT 1200, BSC 1094C
    Corequisite(s): PHT 1211L, PHT 2224, PHT 1010
    Course introduces the student to the theories and practical application of physical therapy modalities. The physiological effects, the indications/contraindications and intervention parameters, of patient care interventions such as heat, cold, radiant therapy, electrotherapy, traction, intermittent compression and massage are presented. Principles of effective documentation and data collection are discussed. Case study analysis requires the student to apply clinical decision making supported by rationales to determine appropriate modality interventions.
  
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    PHT 1211L - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures I Lab


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 1103L, PHT 1200L
    Corequisite(s): PHT 1211, PHT 2224L
    Laboratory sessions for Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures (PHT 1211) are designed to develop student skills in the actual performance of the patient care interventions presented including massage, heat/cold modalities, electrical stimulation, traction, compression and ultrasound. Practical application of each intervention is emphasized with patient simulations and case studies enhancing the ability to understand a plan of care for a patient. Data collection relative to the course content as well as patient and caregiver education are emphasized. Students are expected to demonstrate competency in carrying out an appropriate therapeutic modality plan of care including effective documentation. Practical examinations are completed.
  
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    PHT 1300 - Survey of Pathological Deficits


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisites or Corequisites: PHT 1200, PHT 1310
    Course introduces the student to general pathological conditions with emphasis on those commonly seen in the field of physical therapy. Basic system anatomy is reviewed with an emphasis on the pathophysiology of disease. Descriptions of how diseases are classified and the natural course/prognosis of these diseases are presented. Implications of disease processes, etiology, signs and symptoms, diagnostic testing, contraindications/precautions and treatment are discussed for each pathology presented in this course. When relevant, specific physical therapy plans, such as chest PT, are discussed. The effects of aging upon disease and in general are considered.
  
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    PHT 1310 - Survey of Musculoskeletal Deficits


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: BSC 1094C
    Corequisite: PHT 1300

    Course introduces the student to general pathological conditions with emphasis on those commonly seen in the field of physical therapy as they relate to the musculoskeletal systems. Descriptions of how musculoskeletal diseases are classified and the natural course/prognosis of these diseases are presented. Implications of disease processes, etiology, signs and symptoms, diagnostic testing, contraindications/precautions treatment are discussed for each pathology presented in this course. The effects of aging upon disease and in general are considered.
  
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    PHT 1350 - Basic Pharmacology for Physical Therapist Assistants


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite: PHT 2224, PHT 1010
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHT 2162

    Course introduces concepts of basic pharmacology and presents pharmacological agents dispensed for conditions commonly seen in physical therapy. Drug responses and interactions as they relate to patient response are discussed. Medication implications in the delivery of physical therapy interventions are explored.
  
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    PHT 1801L - Clinical Practice I


    2 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 1300, PHT 1200L
    Corequisite(s): PHT 2224, PHT 1211
    This course is the first in a series of three clinical practicums. Students are expected to preform at a novice level. The course involves student assignment to a local clinical facility. Includes scheduled class meetings to discuss clinical performance objectives, the self-appraisal process, and overall requirements for this novice-level practicum. Discussions may include professionalism, attitudes, patient rapport, sexual harassment, etc. A journal report of clinical experiences and an article review are required. Weekly online discussion forums facilitate critical thinking, peer review, and managing clinical situations at the novice level. Students attend a personal conference with the academic coordinator of clinical education to discuss progress and to identify areas of strength/weakness with appropriate target dates and methods of amelioration, if needed. Students receive a satisfactory/fail grade based upon clinical performance as well as other grading criteria detailed in the course syllabus.
  
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    PHT 2120 - Applied Kinesiology


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 2224, PHT 1010
    Corequisite(s): PHT 2810L
    This course is designed as part of a continuum in the application of anatomy to facilitate student analysis of functional movements with specific focus on the relationship between joint structure and function. Join structure and function including tests and measures for ROM and muscular strength are reintroduced. Special testing procedures, joint play and palpation are introduced which aid the student in understanding pathological movement patterns. Normal gait is detailed as well as discussion of implications of pathological gait patterns. Orthotic interventions for the spine and extremities are presented.
  
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    PHT 2120L - Applied Kinesiology Lab


    1 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 2224L, PHT 1211L
    Corequisite(s): PHT 2120, PHT 1350
    Laboratory sessions for Applied Kinesiology (PHT 2120) are designed to provide opportunities for the students to practice the skills of analyzing normal and pathological gait, along with normal and abnormal movements of the head, spine, pelvis, UE and LE . Interventions are developed to address functional deficits. Palpation of surface anatomy and review of anatomical/bony landmarks and correlation of relevant data collection to biomechanical/functional deficits occurs. Through completion of lab activities and case studies, the student correlates patient problems related to various pathologies with their deficits in functional activities and gait. Therapeutic interventional approaches which include progression will be developed to address functional deficits. Orthotic intervention for the spine and extremities are applied with an emphasis on correcting pathological biomechanics. Practical examinations are completed.
  
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    PHT 2162 - Survey of Neurological Deficits


    3 credit(s)
    Prerequisite(s): PHT 1211
    Corequisite(s): PHT 2810L, PHT 2120
    Course introduces the etiology, pathophysiology and symptoms of common neurological diseases/conditions.  Neurodiagnostic procedures are presented. Course introduces the etiology, pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of common neurological diseases/conditions including, but not limited to, cerebrovascular accidents, traumatic brain injuries, and spinal cord injuries. Basic neuroanatomy of the central and periphieral nervous systems are reviewed. Reflex integration as well as normal growth and development are discussed. Online case studies in the form of Grand Rounds assignments of various neurological conditions are completed.
 

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